Can You Use An AED On A Child?

Can an AED be used on anyone?

Most AEDs are designed for use by non-medical personnel, such as firefighters, police officers, flight attendants, and family members.

With quick cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency defibrillation, you can dramatically help raise the odds of a person surviving a sudden cardiac arrest..

Where do you place AED pads on a child?

AED pad placement in children over the age of 8 would be the same as that of an adult, with one pad placed above the right nipple and the other on the left side of the chest, below the left breast. In children between ages 1 and 8, adult AED pads are placed one on the front of the chest, and the other on the back.

Can I get in trouble for using an AED?

Any individual who is trained to use an AED and who uses one in good faith in an emergency will not be liable for any civil damages. A person who provides CPR and AED training to a person who renders emergency care is not liable for any civil damages.

What is a pediatric attenuator?

Pediatric-Capable AEDs Some AED models are designed for both pediatric and adult use. … One commonly used method for reducing a shock dose is a pediatric dose attenuator (Figure 34). When attached to an AED, it reduces the shock dose by about two thirds. Typically, child pads are used to deliver the reduced shock dose.

Where do you place AED pads?

Apply the pads to the chest according to the pictures on the back of the pads. Place one pad on the right side of the chest, just below the collarbone. Place the other pad on the lower left side of the chest.

How many joules does an AED deliver?

All currently available AEDs are programmed to deliver adult-dose shocks with energies ranging from 150 to 360 Joules (J) when adult pad/cables are used. These adult doses of energy were selected to be safe and effective for adult victims only.

When should you not use an AED?

When Should You Not Use an AED?The Person is Suffering From a Heart Attack. … The AED Is Faulty or Has Expired Parts. … The Victim Has a DNR. … The Victim Is Wet or Lying in Water. … The Victim Has a Medication Patch or Pacemaker. … The Victim Has a Hairy Chest.

How many joules does it take to defibrillate a child?

Pediatric Defibrillation — Current AHA Guidelines With a manual defibrillator (monophasic or biphasic), use a dose of 2 J/kg for the first attempt and 4 J/kg for subsequent attempts.”

How long should you check for breathing while performing CPR?

Check for breathing. Listen carefully, for no more than 10 seconds, for sounds of breathing. (Occasional gasping sounds do not equate to breathing.) If there is no breathing begin CPR.

Is it safe to use an AED when a person is lying on a metal surface?

Can you use a defibrillator on a metal surface? Yes, it’s safe to defibrillator someone who is lying on a metal or conductive surface. The metal poses no shock hazard to either the victim of the SCA, or the rescuer.

What is the maximum weight limit for using pediatric AED pads?

55 poundsAlthough AEDs are manufactured with adults in mind, pediatric settings and pads adjust the energy level used, making them safe for young children who weigh less than 55 pounds. The American Heart Association recommends that pediatric attenuated pads should be used on children under the age of eight and on infants.

Can you use a defib on a child?

An AED can be used on children and infants and should be used as early as possible for the best chance of improving survival. Check the AED when it arrives at the scene. Pediatric pads should be used if the person is less than eight years old. Standard (adult) pads may be used if pediatric pads are not available.

Can you use an AED with a bra on?

Proper steps for performing CPR and using an AED on women Remove all clothing from the patient’s chest – this includes swimsuits, bras, sports bras, tank tops, and regular tops. If you need to, you can cut through clothing with the shears included in an AED’s response kit. Be sure to cut away from the person’s face.

What are the 5 steps involved in using an AED?

Part 2 – Using an AEDStep 1: Locate and fetch the AED. In order to save critical minutes, it is best if the location of the AED is known. … Step 2: Make sure the patient is dry. … Step 3: Turn on the AED and prepare the patient’s chest area. … Step 4: Attach the pads to the chest. … Step 5: Deliver the shock, if advised.

Does insurance pay for AED?

Does insurance cover the cost of AEDs? In most cases, health insurance does not cover the cost of an AED, much like they do not cover the cost of a first aid kit, even though the two are health-related. There are rare cases in which insurance companies have helped cover a portion of the cost, but it is not common.

What does AED stand for?

An AED, or automated external defibrillator, is used to help those experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. It’s a sophisticated, yet easy-to-use, medical device that can analyze the heart’s rhythm and, if necessary, deliver an electrical shock, or defibrillation, to help the heart re-establish an effective rhythm.

How many joules do you shock with?

Apply defibrillator pads (or paddles) and shock the patient with 120-200 Joules on a biphasic defibrillator or 360 Joules using a monophasic. Continue High Quality CPR for 2 minutes (while others are attempting to establish IV or IO access).

What is the youngest age you may use an AED on an individual?

Children over age 8 can be treated with a standard AED. For children ages 1–8, the AHA recommends the pediatric attenuated pads that are purchased separately. In infants <1 year of age a manual defibrillator is preferred. if not available, an aed with dose attenuator may be used.

Can you use an AED with no heartbeat?

Is an AED useful for all types of cardiac arrest? No. Other abnormal rhythms like a very slow heart rate or no heartbeat at all, can’t be treated with an AED. When a user puts the AED’s electrodes or adhesive pads on a victim’s chest, the device determines whether the patient’s heart needs to be shocked or not.

What is the correct chest compression depth for a child?

Compression depth for a child is at least ⅓ the depth of the chest size, or 5 cm for a child and 4 cm for an infant.